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THE ORIGIN

DRS Arts Company places great value on the philosophies of Jainism. Our company logo symbolises the importance of serving the art ecosystem.

A couple of years back Chaitya Dhanvi Shah, the managing director of DRS ARTS Company, visited Palitana (well-known for being Shashwata or the ultimate Jain Tirth in the world) during Paryushan (an important Jain festival during which the followers take vows and observe fasts with intensity at par with monasticism). Paryushan is a period of spiritual celebration among Jains. It can be described as the time period of receiving knowledge through the sermons of Jain ascetics in the form of Vyakhyan. While listening to one of the Vyakhyans, Chaitya stumbled upon the overwhelming ideologies of Sangh and Samosaran.

THE ORIGIN

DRS Arts Company places great value on the philosophies of Jainism. Our company logo symbolises the importance of serving the art ecosystem.

A couple of years back Chaitya Dhanvi Shah, the managing director of DRS ARTS Company, visited Palitana (well-known for being Shashwata or the ultimate Jain Tirth in the world) during Paryushan (an important Jain festival during which the followers take vows and observe fasts with intensity at par with monasticism). Paryushan is a period of spiritual celebration among Jains. It can be described as the time period of receiving knowledge through the sermons of Jain ascetics in the form of Vyakhyan. While listening to one of the Vyakhyans, Chaitya stumbled upon the overwhelming ideologies of Sangh and Samosaran.

NINE CONCEPTS BEHIND THE COMPANY LOGO

FIRST

In the Jain religion, Samosaran (meaning Retreat for All) is a term used to describe the divine assembly hall of the Tirthankara. Samosaran can also be defined as a place where all are given a common opportunity to acquire wisdom. According to Jain texts, not only the gods but humans and animals too were invited to be seated (thus endorsing the ecosystem) in the allotted sections of the large assembly hall called Samosaran, listen to the discourses of a Tirthankar and go back gaining wisdom.

In Samosaran, a Tirthankar sits facing the east, but appears to be looking in all directions – akin to our logo that focus on all fields of art. All humans and animals are considered one and the same and are invited to hear the discourse – thus creating an environment of harmony among all sects and classes of living beings. Similar to the Samosaran, DRS Arts Company caters to the entire Indian art ecosystem without factoring whether you are a naïve art lover, an art scholar, an art collector, an art investor, or a learned art researcher.

SECOND

The term Sangha in Jainism refers to the fourfold community of a Sadhu (male monk), a Sadhvi (female monk), a Shravak (male household follower/devotee) and a Shravika (female household follower/devotee). The Sangha considers every person equally important.

The Sangha follows a democratic approach, that everyone should be in sync, balanced and must go hand in hand. Every viewpoint, perspective and vote is appreciated and only after the Sadhu, Sadhvi, Shravak and Shravika reach an agreement, the Jain society rolls in the modification.

Similar to the concept of Sangha, DRS Arts Company believes the art ecosystem is sustained by the four stakeholders – artists; the collectors; the museums and private organizations; and the society at large. The role of each stakeholder is important in contribution to the growth of Indian arts and culture.

THIRD

Jain philosophy has always extended the concepts of democratic rights and civil society and orienting action followed with responsibility – our logo also stands for the same. We believe that art exists for all – from a layman to a philosopher, from a child to an octogenarian.

FOURTH

The medieval era Jain texts explain the concepts of Anekāntavāda (or “many-sidedness”) with the parable of ‘The Blind Men and an Elephant’ (Andhgajanyāyah). The blind men keep arguing that their version of the elephant is how the elephant looks. Finally, a sighted man enters the parable and describes the entire elephant from all the perspectives and make the blind men realize that they were all partially wrong and partially correct. While one’s subjective experience is true, it may not be the totality of truth.

Our logo has similarly been used to illustrate a range of truths and fallacies; broadly that one’s subjective experience of art can be true, but that such an art experience is inherently limited by the behaviour of experts in fields where there is a deficit or inaccessibility of information, and thus respect all different perspectives.

Similarly, DRS ARTS Company can have different perspectives and divulge in different art-related fields, but the ultimate truth of the company is to focus on QUALITY ART – art that can be sustained forever.

FIFTH

The sharp lines of the logo going in cardinal and intercardinal directions symbolizes the company’s connectivity and dedication to make Indian art reach the global market and make Indian art available in every house, every city and every continent in the world. The vertical lines that signify being powerful, superior and established, like a stake in the ground. The soft and roundish organic shapes signify those soft fuzzy artistic feelings that a mathematically perfect circle cannot.

SIXTH

The in-sync lines, form and shapes with red and white colour of the logo signifies the evolving zest of DRS Arts.

SEVENTH

The logo reinforces the idea of being intrinsically simple yet modern and elegant, indicating the company’s growth and expansion, benefitting both – the artists as well as the art buyers. The logo is designed to showcase what we deliver – serving the art ecosystem with quality and integrity.

EIGHTH

The colours used in the logo are red and white, symbolising passion and purity respectively. The colour red also indicates our passion for arts, while the colour white embodies the canvas – consequently indicating the balance between art and commerce.

NINTH

The logo’s design has also been influenced by the Vees Sthanak Yantra (holy diagram), an auspicious yantra to which one resorts to for becoming a Tirthankar, making it one of the most powerful yantras in Jainism.

FIRST

In the Jain religion, Samosaran (meaning Retreat for All) is a term used to describe the divine assembly hall of the Tirthankara. Samosaran can also be defined as a place where all are given a common opportunity to acquire wisdom. According to Jain texts, not only the gods but humans and animals too were invited to be seated (thus endorsing the ecosystem) in the allotted sections of the large assembly hall called Samosaran, listen to the discourses of a Tirthankar and go back gaining wisdom.

In Samosaran, a Tirthankar sits facing the east, but appears to be looking in all directions – akin to our logo that focus on all fields of art. All humans and animals are considered one and the same and are invited to hear the discourse – thus creating an environment of harmony among all sects and classes of living beings. Similar to the Samosaran, DRS Arts Company caters to the entire Indian art ecosystem without factoring whether you are a naïve art lover, an art scholar, an art collector, an art investor, or a learned art researcher.

SECOND

The term Sangha in Jainism refers to the fourfold community of a Sadhu (male monk), a Sadhvi (female monk), a Shravak (male household follower/devotee) and a Shravika (female household follower/devotee). The Sangha considers every person equally important.

The Sangha follows a democratic approach, that everyone should be in sync, balanced and must go hand in hand. Every viewpoint, perspective and vote is appreciated and only after the Sadhu, Sadhvi, Shravak and Shravika reach an agreement, the Jain society rolls in the modification.

Similar to the concept of Sangha, DRS Arts Company believes the art ecosystem is sustained by the four stakeholders – artists; the collectors; the museums and private organizations; and the society at large. The role of each stakeholder is important in contribution to the growth of Indian arts and culture.

THIRD

Jain philosophy has always extended the concepts of democratic rights and civil society and orienting action followed with responsibility – our logo also stands for the same. We believe that art exists for all – from a layman to a philosopher, from a child to an octogenarian.

FOURTH

The medieval era Jain texts explain the concepts of Anekāntavāda (or “many-sidedness”) with the parable of ‘The Blind Men and an Elephant’ (Andhgajanyāyah). The blind men keep arguing that their version of the elephant is how the elephant looks. Finally, a sighted man enters the parable and describes the entire elephant from all the perspectives and make the blind men realize that they were all partially wrong and partially correct. While one’s subjective experience is true, it may not be the totality of truth.

Our logo has similarly been used to illustrate a range of truths and fallacies; broadly that one’s subjective experience of art can be true, but that such an art experience is inherently limited by the behaviour of experts in fields where there is a deficit or inaccessibility of information, and thus respect all different perspectives.

Similarly, DRS ARTS Company can have different perspectives and divulge in different art-related fields, but the ultimate truth of the company is to focus on QUALITY ART – art that can be sustained forever.

FIFTH

The sharp lines of the logo going in cardinal and intercardinal directions symbolizes the company’s connectivity and dedication to make Indian art reach the global market and make Indian art available in every house, every city and every continent in the world. The vertical lines that signify being powerful, superior and established, like a stake in the ground. The soft and roundish organic shapes signify those soft fuzzy artistic feelings that a mathematically perfect circle cannot.

SIXTH

The in-sync lines, form and shapes with red and white colour of the logo signifies the evolving zest of DRS Arts.

SEVENTH

The logo reinforces the idea of being intrinsically simple yet modern and elegant, indicating the company’s growth and expansion, benefitting both – the artists as well as the art buyers. The logo is designed to showcase what we deliver – serving the art ecosystem with quality and integrity.

EIGHTH

The colours used in the logo are red and white, symbolising passion and purity respectively. The colour red also indicates our passion for arts, while the colour white embodies the canvas – consequently indicating the balance between art and commerce.

NINTH

The logo’s design has also been influenced by the Vees Sthanak Yantra (holy diagram), an auspicious yantra to which one resorts to for becoming a Tirthankar, making it one of the most powerful yantras in Jainism.